Rephotography

The art of then and now – the skill of capturing the distance of time. Phenomenal strategy that I often overlook to recognize, yet I at times I catch myself that use it frequently without even noticing it when composing longer term projects.

Curiosity and search for a new element of a chosen subject makes me often go back and photograph it again, within a certain time span. I can’t think how many times I photographed the same place, the same person not realizing that capturing the time span is the power we, photographers, have. I have favourite places and people that I go back to and photograph. During sports season I catch myself checking out the familiar places and people, players, coaches, often in the same spot, the same position to discover what time has done to my subject.

Dorchester Mill Pond in Dorchester Ontario is one of the places I frequently visit. It is a perfect place for family photos. I love it for its’ seasonal appeal. It is one of the places where I love to challenge myself to make photographs of subjects I previously visited and search of differences in scenery changes, perhaps a detail or two is added.

Rephotography makes me think about looking for older photographs and capture my subject now. The images below show the track of time; something I find fascinating; my subjects not always agreeing with me.

While researching  landscape rephotography I came across an article about landscape changes in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. I looked at the images from the perspective of a photographer, but also with an interest in ecology, preservation and how we humans influence the environmental changes – http://canadianmountainnetwork.ca/2017/12/13/capturing-landscape-change-repeat-photography/

Another interesting link related to landscape rephotography with regards to landscape surveying https://www.landscapesinmotion.ca/updates-1/2018/5/28/repeat-photography

Today’s technology allows photographers and artists to experiment with old and new photographs using the latest software. Sergey Larenkov, a Russian photographer creates images that are a combination of old World War II and modern images and blends them together in Photoshop to create stunning visual effects. https://mymodernmet.com/my-modern-shop-sergey-larenkov/

The fascination with the distance of time perhaps can be attributed to development of various apps currently trending on social media. These apps transform individual’s faces, giving them older look https://www.facebook.com/agingbooth

Another app for rephotography for smartphones is called projectphoto and it works by aligning selected photos. http://projectrephoto.com/projectRephoto

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